This week I’m reflecting on the wisdom of two great sages, Ramakrishna and Confucious. Ramakrishna taught us that your words can and will define you. Confucious made it clear that knowing and thinking must go hand in hand, going as far to say that one without the other can be disastrous. The battle between President Trump’s and media is a perfect example of exactly what these two great men were trying to teach, offering lessons that both the media and the President need to take to heart.

Let me first say right off the bat that I never thought I would be writing to defend President Donald Trump. Naturally, with the recent inauguration, he’s been on my mind. But to find myself, in support of Trump never entered my realm of possibility.

Originally, I had set out to address recent claims by the new Administration, that “the media” was not giving our new President unbiased coverage. To my astonishment and angst (I voted for the other girl), I have to agree. However, to be fair, much of what Trump has said and is still saying, is braggadocious – easily left open for interpretation.  So, who’s fault is it?

For weeks up to the election, I had heard and believed that then Candidate Donald Trump had colluded with “the Russians” to hack the Democratic National Convention and Hillary Clinton. If you had asked me before doing my research, I would have bet heavily that Candidate Trump had in fact called on someone outside of the US to hack Hillary. It was widely reported that Trump had said this during a press conference. To my surprise and chagrin, guess what, he never said what “the media” claims he said.

While his exact words were ill-advised, careless, easily misinterpreted, and far from presidential, he never “told” anyone to “do” anybody: he hoped if they did do the hacking that they found Hillary’s missing email. That’s a far stretch from calling up Putin and asking him to do something about Hillary, which is how “the media” has portrayed his comments.

In research this post, I found an article on Politico, written by Michael Crowley, titled Trump urges Russia to hack Clinton’s Email. I feel compelled to point out that I’m only using Politico as an example (do your own research reader: the media is as biased as Tump is his own worst enemy ). Above the title was video I’ve listened to over and over and nowhere does Trump invite, “urge” or suggest Russian “should hack” anyone. Here is what he did say, which to Politico and the author’s credit can be found in the second paragraph of their article:

 “I will tell you this, Russia: If you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing,” the Republican nominee said at a news conference in Florida.

He “HOPED!” There is a bid difference between hoping and “urging” (Politico) “calls on” (NY Times) “asked” (Salon) “hack and publish” (The Guardian) –  don’t these organizations know what a dictionary is? Don’t they understand what they are doing to their own credibility?

There is no question that much of what Trump said during this election cycle was just plain stupid (knowing w/out thinking) – sadly, he’s still doing it and probably always will. More worrisome though and thoroughly unconscionable was the extensive twisting of facts to lead the public to “the media’s” conclusion, rather than laying out the facts and letting the American people decide on their own. There is no doubt and clear evidence for anyone willing to see it that the media intentionally mislead the public to question the legitimacy of the election and as a result, it has flown over this presidency.

There is no doubt and clear evidence for anyone willing to see it that the media intentionally mislead the public to question the legitimacy of the election and as a result, it has flown over this presidency. It’s equally obvious that the President rarely thinks before he speaks and is going to have a rocky Presidency because of it. Both the President and the media need to choose their words more carefully, the people are watching.

Both the President and the media need to choose their words more carefully and take a moment to reflect on the wisdom of Confucius:

Learning without thought is labor lost;

thought without learning is perilous ~ Confucious

 

 

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